Wild Friday: Slain Elephants, Ivory Poachers, and Seven Baby Rhinos Rescued from Threatened Places

Seventy-five elephants are now feared dead in Kenya as they disappeared from the Sanjay Elephant Sanctuary. The herd is now believed to have been killed by poachers. Meanwhile, elsewhere, three rhinos were found dead…

Wild Friday: Slain Elephants, Ivory Poachers, and Seven Baby Rhinos Rescued from Threatened Places

Seventy-five elephants are now feared dead in Kenya as they disappeared from the Sanjay Elephant Sanctuary. The herd is now believed to have been killed by poachers. Meanwhile, elsewhere, three rhinos were found dead in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Virunga National Park due to a mysterious, forest fire. Paging Project WildAid!

Another elephant died after apparently straying into Libya from Tanzania in the early hours of Wednesday. The animal jumped a security perimeter, is believed to have come into contact with other elephants, and was later shot dead in a military shootout.

In Mozambique, 25 new rhinos were rescued last Friday as part of efforts to increase numbers of the endangered species. The animals were targeted by poachers and sold to a local butcher for $3,000. Thirteen adult rhinos were seized and transported to the Cape flint Rhino Project. Seven babies were also found with their mothers.

The Government of Mozambique and Fauna and Flora International, a wildlife conservation organization, teamed up in the operation, which ultimately saved the lives of at least 30 of the animals.

An unusual wedding was held in South Africa last weekend. Couples wanting to save money by getting married in the country were asked to adopt an animal from the Kruger National Park, the country’s third biggest national park. Two hundred brides and grooms exchanged rings while walking amongst elephants, komodo dragons, camels, lions, and giraffes.

Despite the remote nature of the country’s zoos, nearly 400 new species have been born there in the past decade, including black-tailed macaques, “kinkajou” monkeys, orangutans, red panda, and rhinos.

And lastly, a sad story on this “Wild” Friday. Mother Nature killed another shrew. This time in the Puerto Rico Capital of San Juan, the victim was a 12-year-old female shrew, nicknamed the Cookie Monster by its residents. She was killed by a 1-year-old male mongrel.

A similar type of killing occurred in Kenya in 2015, when the world lost a Blackbuck, an endangered species. A female called Jellybean was mauled to death by a 1-year-old pet male.

Bottom line: as we learn of more grisly animals tragedies, people do need to be alert for people breaking in through their backyards. And they also need to know that they need to heed their neighbors and their local Parks. And even if it’s tough to try and trust your neighbor, but it’s still the right thing to do, and knowing the rules will help you feel a little safer!

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