Why Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal will rule men’s tennis for years to come

Written by Staff Writer With Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal performing stellar tournament play and holding their places at the top of the rankings, some are starting to wonder whether it’s time to pump…

Why Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal will rule men's tennis for years to come

Written by Staff Writer

With Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal performing stellar tournament play and holding their places at the top of the rankings, some are starting to wonder whether it’s time to pump the breaks on a men’s grand slam tennis era.

That’s especially the case when you consider the depth of talent in men’s tennis right now — with up-and-coming stars such as Alexander Zverev, Nick Kyrgios and Novak Djokovic finding life on the big stage frustratingly hard.

Kyrgios, who is currently ranked 16 in the world, said to reporters after playing in the Wimbledon third round that tennis is fickle,

“It’s so similar to soccer where somebody could dominate for one month. And then… I feel like people kind of say that we’re the second highest level behind baseball. … But I don’t know, it’s cool. I think I’m going to have a cool career, but it doesn’t last forever.”

Nick Kyrgios in action at Wimbledon. Credit: AFP/AFP/Getty Images

He may be only 23 years old, but Kyrgios is not the only tennis star to give the sport a new lease of life.

15-year-old Alexander Zverev, younger brother of Mischa, a former Wimbledon quarterfinalist, burst onto the scene in 2016 and is the most likely dark horse to dethrone the current men’s superstars.

Ex-Roger Federer doubles partner David Sock and 29-year-old American John Isner have gone on to win high-profile tournaments such as the French Open and Wimbledon in the last couple of years.

Slovakian player, Adam Pavlasek has also hit it big, winning the Australian Open junior title in January.

Even Roger Federer’s much-vaunted upstart status has gained credibility when it comes to ATP Tour events. The 31-year-old was just the third player, after Yannick Noah and Pat Rafter, to record 10 straight finals wins in major tournaments dating back to 2003.

But Murray, eight-time Wimbledon winner, has warned against delirium, although he agreed the performance of Djokovic and Federer — who continues to impress — means the game faces a future without a traditional star.

“It’ll change,” Murray told players’ magazine WTA. “You’ve got to be aware of the fact that someone else could come along — that doesn’t mean it’s good.

“There’s a couple of really tough matches going on here right now (against Juan Martin del Potro and Marin Cilic).”

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