We’re told the summer is the best time for outdoor activities — but should you take certain meds outside anyway?

By Jonathan Freund, MD and Lisa Rodriguez, DSC; Affiliate Physicians at C.D.C. — It’s summertime and that usually means that C.D.C. recommends that we head outside and take advantage of our beautiful, sunny, sweltering…

We’re told the summer is the best time for outdoor activities — but should you take certain meds outside anyway?

By Jonathan Freund, MD and Lisa Rodriguez, DSC; Affiliate Physicians at C.D.C. —

It’s summertime and that usually means that C.D.C. recommends that we head outside and take advantage of our beautiful, sunny, sweltering lawns. But many of us will be delayed in our summer fun as we wait for dreaded C.D.C. summertime drug recommendations. The C.D.C. has been reviewing changes to several important drugs for decades and we will see new medications for a variety of conditions and ailments sometime this summer.

The current season of summer medications calls for us to pay attention to new and less common, potentially life-saving medications. These drugs are often given to combat things like rare infections, mental health issues, some cancers and chronic pain and much more.

In many cases, many of us can benefit from one of these new medications. But there are those conditions for which we may or may not need that medicine. When we watch for symptoms of these problems, the C.D.C. has also just recently updated its recommended guidelines for C.D.C. apps (available in English and Spanish). Some of these apps offer user-friendly information about conditions while others make it easy to track your healthcare experience, add medications and medications to your current medication cabinet, manage your medications and all aspects of your overall healthcare. They also include common questions and answers.

A few of the suggested Summer of Blood Pressure Apps are available online:

American Heart Association, App: Users report that the American Heart Association App is essential to them in managing their blood pressure. Users can follow their blood pressure medications with the smartphone app and comment on their symptoms.

American Stroke Association, App: Sometimes a smartphone app can help you access information you may need, whether it’s about your medication or other health problems. The American Stroke Association app can aid you in using a new and potentially life-saving medication. It contains hundreds of prevention tips, unique features, and links to doctor’s offices, emergency rooms, and all over the web.

Billion Hearts: Provides a quick, easy-to-use tool to help you manage your heart health. It links to the American Heart Association App to let you know if your blood pressure is ideal and is keeping track of your personal heart health issues. It can tell you when you are at risk for sudden death and also offers “never sleep by yourself with your smartphone,” an impressive feature.

Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund: This is a handy tool for people with chronic illnesses that affect daily functioning. Some accounts can be used to help fill out the C.D.C.’s information and to report concerns about medication interactions, side effects, interactions with other medications, medications and labs.

Medical Marijuana Association of Maryland, App: Users report that the Maryland Medical Marijuana Association of Maryland App is essential in finding medical marijuana dispensaries. The app offers information on locating medical marijuana dispensaries in Maryland and enables you to send in your addresses in order to write a letter.

“Prenatal Screening” and Initial Immunization in the C.D.C. App: It’s recommended that your partner or your gynecologist should perform a screening of the cervix and the urinary bladder for papilloma virus and syphilis. Your partner should also give you a short, focused measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. Do not receive the full course of three MMR doses as this vaccine could cause a mild allergic reaction.

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