Watchdog: Changing the Game in the Car Market

Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) By Thomas Byrne, FOX News Radio When Volvo heard the news that it was being pulled from the stock market, the firm bought…

Watchdog: Changing the Game in the Car Market

Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

By Thomas Byrne, FOX News Radio

When Volvo heard the news that it was being pulled from the stock market, the firm bought the rights to make new versions of its cars.

“We have a responsibility to provide Volvo cars to our customers,” says Alan McDonald, Head of the Compact Automotive Group at Volvo.

A car that drives like a train? Volvo’s new cars promise to be exhilarating. Some models don’t have doors, or even seats. Others use a lifting system that folds down their seats so you don’t look like you’re doing shuffleboard in your seats. One even has air filtration that allows you to see your anti-smog system from 3,000 feet away. Some people have already got their hands on the cars.

“We’ve received over 12,000 enquiries for the cars,” says McDonald.

Another big selling point are four doors instead of five. A lot of people have the gut feeling that a car with six doors is like a suit of armor. If someone walks up to your car, you can say you’re going to get in but by the time you get into the car you’ll be naked. Four doors do away with all that.

McDonald says:

“To drive four door cars you do need to have four doors. There are some people, it doesn’t matter what the car is, they prefer the four door so it’s still a question of whether you get six doors or four doors. Volvo and Skoda have taken four door cars to a new level. We know the conventional wisdom is you have a centre console, you have a headrest and people like that stuff, but what we have found with the Swedes, they like the freedom and the accessibility of the four door Volvo.”

Check out photos of the new Volvo S60, here.

These cars are aimed at young professionals, the millennials. They want to make new cars less painful to drive, and not have those mom and dad automatic transmissions.

Ian Fletcher, Director of Research for IHS Markit says:

“How much effort, money and innovation are we putting into the experiences we provide? That’s one of the really big shifts happening within the industry, and it’s starting to have an impact on the sales volumes and on the price.”

As more and more millennials start buying cars, that means they will start using the experience better than the technology. It’s where the next big wave of innovation will be coming from.

Thomas Byrne is the host of “FOX and Friends Weekend”, on the FOX News Radio app.

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