U.S. rethinking stricter limits on short-term visas

The Trump administration appears to be reversing its decision to reduce the number of visitors who are allowed into the United States for visits of less than 90 days. In December, the Department of…

U.S. rethinking stricter limits on short-term visas

The Trump administration appears to be reversing its decision to reduce the number of visitors who are allowed into the United States for visits of less than 90 days.

In December, the Department of Homeland Security said it was reducing the number of visitors it allows into the country because of U.S. safety concerns. “While our ability to identify new, unreported risks and to keep those risks secret has not diminished,” said the department, “there are legitimate reasons to consider the threat of terrorist attacks against travelers to the United States when we reformulate this design.”

But now the Homeland Security Department is starting to reverse its policy, which was retroactive from March to last month. The department’s website said that visas approved after March 1 will be good for nine months rather than one year, and that it “regrets any inconvenience or concern that this decision may cause.”

Still, for both men and women who aren’t arriving in the country with an American Express card, there is no guarantee that their American passports will be fast-tracked for entry to the United States.

But the government already has announced that the United States would close the beefed-up gate at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on June 30 after a U.S. border guard said that 40 unaccompanied minors from Central America had swam over the border on the U.S. side. The children may not be able to leave the closed gate for at least a year, according to the Associated Press.

Also, a federal judge in San Diego ruled in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union that the Trump administration violated a federal law that requires that asylum claims be heard no more than an hour after they are filed. The Department of Homeland Security said it intends to appeal.

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