Study: Using the ‘clock method’ before and after childbirth increases likelihood of stillbirth

More than 36,000 babies die every year in the United States from placental complications that are partly attributable to complications from the water that is placed in the foetus to keep it warm. A…

Study: Using the ‘clock method’ before and after childbirth increases likelihood of stillbirth

More than 36,000 babies die every year in the United States from placental complications that are partly attributable to complications from the water that is placed in the foetus to keep it warm.

A new research effort sponsored by the nonprofit organization Promoting Healthy Birth has found that women who use the rhythm method (in which the woman tells the doctor how many weeks pregnant she is when she visits), have a much higher rate of gestational loss (or stillbirth) than those who don’t. The study doesn’t directly apply to couples who experience hormonal trimesters; in those cases, a woman changes her behavior accordingly. Instead, the findings apply to women who are already at or about the stage of gestation where the water is released in three or four pregnancies.

While many clinicians believe that the loss of water before or after the birth is related to the multiple pregnancies, the findings add to a long debate about the broader issue.

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