Moon reflects in blood red: Be part of epic lunar eclipse

The eclipse was visible from southeastern Asia to Russia and Greenland. The full phases could be seen from a stretch of sea level over India and the Bay of Bengal. The disc of the…

Moon reflects in blood red: Be part of epic lunar eclipse

The eclipse was visible from southeastern Asia to Russia and Greenland. The full phases could be seen from a stretch of sea level over India and the Bay of Bengal.

The disc of the Moon was 2 degrees, or 2.33 percent, below the horizon for about 3.5 hours, beginning at 4:31 a.m. EDT and ending about 7 a.m. EDT.

This was the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century. While not quite as long as the longest eclipse of the 20th century — July 2017’s total lunar eclipse — it was longer than any other this century.

The time between half and full eclipses is called the eclipse’s “ephemeral phase.” If an eclipse started just two hours earlier than it did, then the start and end phases would be two hours apart. During this eclipse, the end of the total eclipse was at 8:34 a.m. EDT, about 3 1/2 hours before the beginning of the start of the bottom of the shadow shadow.

The moon looked grayish-white and lacked the usual noticeable bluish pallor that often emanates from eclipses. People living in Australia and New Zealand would have seen the entire eclipse, but residents of countries along the Pacific Ocean would have seen only a partial phase.

The unassuming moon became, for many places, a lantern glowing with blood red tones.

The reddish “tint” was caused by an incredible solar phenomenon known as photochemical solar eclipses.

The moon appears redder in such eclipses, partly because sunlight passing through dusty dust in the atmosphere of the Earth, which covers more of the surface than Earth’s atmosphere allows for, is scattered into red bands.

However, when the sun shines directly on the Moon, it deflects sunlight and the same filters block the sunlight that would ordinarily cast a red glow.

In fact, eclipses can give moon watchers clues about the nature of the moon’s atmosphere.

Several years ago, when South America and the southern United States were facing the opposite direction from the sun and therefore views of an eclipse were blocked, scientists at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, used data from the moon as well as images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to measure the varying size of the lunar atmosphere.

By taking into account all the various variations in opacity and brightness caused by the different activities of sunlight, the team was able to create a truer impression of the amount of dust in the moon’s atmosphere and see whether the quality of that dust is changing over time.

Besides lunar dust, there are also lunar micrometeorites and volcanic gases within the lunar atmosphere.

Because the Earth is surrounded by an atmosphere that constantly changes, each eclipse is unique.

So the unassuming moon became, for many places, a lantern glowing with blood red tones.

There are only nine total lunar eclipses per century, and another will occur in about 130 years.

Full eclipses visible in the United States

Below are the states with the greatest possible visibility of the partial lunar eclipse.

Any event that falls on Oct. 5 or 5 may be mentioned in this guide.

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