Jonathan Kanter Says Google Misuses Its Ethics

(Originally published 4/19/2018) – In an op-ed written for Fox News, editor and executive producer of The Weekly Standard Jonathan K. Kanter says Google denies him the chance to be “an independent public debate…

Jonathan Kanter Says Google Misuses Its Ethics

(Originally published 4/19/2018) – In an op-ed written for Fox News, editor and executive producer of The Weekly Standard Jonathan K. Kanter says Google denies him the chance to be “an independent public debate moderator,” and not only is he upset, he also says the whole tech industry owes him an apology. This is all because Google’s ads were placed against a story Kanter decided to place on the Facebook Trending Topics feature. The article allegedly brought attention to a Mexican drug lord named “El Chapo.” In fact, the drug lord, El Chapo was featured by The Weekly Standard, and Kanter says he was very pleased to be included. He says he was surprised when he got the news that Google’s advertising platforms excluded his publication from the list of articles to be featured. Kanter says, “the omission is likely based on The Weekly Standard’s affiliation with a conservative political bent.” Kanter says, “If facts and logic are a barrier for Google to use its tools, then all of the free expression and speech of the First Amendment is a wall.”

Kanter seems determined to be at the forefront of a controversial and dangerous topic. But in this case, a fact may be the barrier he can’t break through. This article states the Mexican drug lord had a $14.4 million bid on a parking lot lot in Connecticut. But the article does not name the man whose bid was the highest. That makes it impossible for Google to actually decide Kanter’s impartiality. And before Kanter raised an arm at the tower, he asked Google how it could. He says, “Does Google not believe in individuals?” And he brings up Jonathan Kennedy, the man, whose name Google blocks from appearing on the NewsFeed. Kanter says, “He created Facebook and now he has herded people like sheep to his advertiser’s door.” He says, “I know it is more than the phonebook, but Google doesn’t believe in showing human beings on the phonebook if they have political views that oppose theirs.”

So what can Kanter do, other than be patient? “If my publisher is willing to go on my show to say, the Weekly Standard is conservative but we are not intolerant of others, who are not supposed to have different political views, well I would like to hear that from him,” says Kanter.

Kanter is willing to use his strengths to be an unbiased anchor. “If Google would show me that I do not have to call out any leaders of the media, or any other publisher of this or that in front of my audience, I would give that full opportunity to the host,” says Kanter.

Kanter says he can only be told Google feels he can’t be unbiased and doesn’t really care. That would be fine, he says, if Google actually believed that. “But I don’t think it’s there,” says Kanter.

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