Faulkner didn’t think books were books. He knew, he said, that they’re really stories.

Faulkner knew the value of storytelling: as his biographer Eloise Horne wrote in his essay “Faulkner: A Vision of an Author,” “His books were written not from a loss of confidence, but from a…

Faulkner didn’t think books were books. He knew, he said, that they’re really stories.

Faulkner knew the value of storytelling: as his biographer Eloise Horne wrote in his essay “Faulkner: A Vision of an Author,” “His books were written not from a loss of confidence, but from a heartfelt belief that the stories should be profound, that they should dispel a kind of sleeping draught or coolness that had accumulated within the labyrinth.” He had a true ability to help people understand their experiences and their world. He combined his quest for knowledge and mastery of his craft to create intensely heartfelt stories, novels that were story-filled and filled with wisdom. Often he helped readers come to a deeper understanding of their own lives, which in turn, in turn, led them to help others.

Of course, Faulkner wasn’t all literary wordsmiths and camp fires. Sometimes he wrote funny, sharp-tongued, often bitter and crude — especially about his journey to gain fame as a writer. He also lived and worked much of his life in Kentucky, wrote from the perspective of a farm boy. Often his stories directly reflect his childhood, or his struggles with the unspeakable mental and emotional turmoil that existed in his own home. Some of his books dwelled in such dark places, even after his death, that it would be difficult to revisit his work and read it without another author’s edits to help the story move forward. But that’s part of how stories work and evolve and what makes them such powerful pieces of art.

This series of short stories explores Faulkner’s childhood, featuring not only his two favorite authors but some of his other mentors in the literary world, too.

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