Cross-posted: experts debate why rail bollards are necessary | Guardian Weekend readers’ letters

I was in a train station and saw that the pedestrian-only sidewalk was now barricaded with bollards, cutting it off from the normal flow of the railway tracks. My first reaction was that to…

Cross-posted: experts debate why rail bollards are necessary | Guardian Weekend readers' letters

I was in a train station and saw that the pedestrian-only sidewalk was now barricaded with bollards, cutting it off from the normal flow of the railway tracks.

My first reaction was that to protect everyone is to keep them in one place. Is this necessary?

ALISON DAWSON, Braemar, Aberdeenshire

Careful pedestrians

If so, will having runners travelling up the escalators and travellers using the stairs over the bollards be safer? A quick tweet to Transport for London found that it might be. When “Do you see similar bollards in other stations” was asked, the Tweet led back to his answer: “Yep, Bah! This is a busy railway station. In winter, lines can be tricky to navigate and footpaths are a tempting place to hide.” It is clearly safer to have people up and down the escalators and steps, so the bollards make more sense.

JC, London

Top players

In his Guardian article, how the world’s netball rulers should not grab team spirit by “buffing walls with net and rafters”, Stephen Marshall is in tune with the kind of rugby logic that is being employed for safety, leading him to wonder why players who are “top to their boots” who are “able to handle themselves safely on the field” should be subjected to nets and rafters.

The problem with Marshall’s concept, however, is that “safe” is less a given on the rugby pitch than it is when playing footie and cricketers often struggle to maintain fitness levels once they have lost the element of surprise. Additionally, the professional and record-breaking fast bowler Chris Tremlett has recently revealed his horror of netball players’ running. No wonder he has threatened to have them “put down”, he exclaimed: “You’re doing it in the stupidest way possible. I’m telling you now, I’m not taking it.” And he didn’t stop there. “I’ve got nothing for you. It’s been brilliant. It’s been great. But if I’m paying for it, you’re in trouble. And so am I. It’s just got to be wrapped up and we’ve had a stew about it for half an hour or so.”

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1-12 July deadline

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