Alec Baldwin talks ‘Saturday Night Live,’ ‘Hannity’ and his portrayal of Donald Trump

Written by By Anna Donovan, CNN As actor Alec Baldwin’s new show — premiering on Sunday — makes its debut on the same night his series “Match Game” gets renewed for another season, the…

Alec Baldwin talks 'Saturday Night Live,' 'Hannity' and his portrayal of Donald Trump

Written by By Anna Donovan, CNN

As actor Alec Baldwin’s new show — premiering on Sunday — makes its debut on the same night his series “Match Game” gets renewed for another season, the conversation inevitably turns to the two separate careers he has now evolved into.

For one, there’s his long career in front of the camera, during which he’s had a hand in more than 70 feature films, and received an Oscar nomination for his role in 1979’s “Moonstruck.” Then there’s the recent transformations, largely thanks to his current gig as Donald Trump’s unpaid (and frequently berated) aide in NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.”

“I’m funny, not acting funny … I think it’s me as an actor and kind of me as a man that makes me different from many other actors,” Baldwin said on his “Hannity” show on Friday.

Who knew Baldwin was nervous about a career in movies? Click through our slideshow below to find out more.

CNN screenshot by Raya Jalabi, CNN

As his latest “Saturday Night Live” chapter comes to a close, we caught up with Baldwin, who has appeared on the show for the last 25 years. He talks about the show’s renewed longevity, including its attraction to younger viewers who find it ‘funny’, the role as Trump and what it was like to perform with Melissa McCarthy, who recently debuted as Sean Spicer.

CNN screenshot by Raya Jalabi, CNN

The former union member has also recently served as a trustee for the New York Actor’s Equity Association. We chatted with Baldwin about the challenges the actor with a multigenerational fan base faces every day, especially when starring in projects as edgy as “Nine Months.”

“Some people seem to really connect to this particular work, some people maybe not quite as much. The generation gap is interesting to me — the notion of wanting to be connected, and not wanting to be connected,” he says.

“The thing about your own generation is you try to create it and create it and create it with things that you know are real. To me that’s what people like Elaine Stritch or Arthur Miller or Stephen Sondheim are doing.”

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