A look at ‘the explosion of visual culture that liberated America’

New York City has gone through a lot of changes in the past 100 years. During the latter half of the 20th century, the American capital of the visual arts became known as a…

A look at 'the explosion of visual culture that liberated America'

New York City has gone through a lot of changes in the past 100 years. During the latter half of the 20th century, the American capital of the visual arts became known as a pariah. But in the 1920s, New York City was a booming cultural center in New York state, where the cultural elite crowded into blocks of restaurants, art galleries, and big events like the New York World’s Fair. Photographer Andrew Kandel took portraits of that boom-time scene that provide a glimpse into the culture of those times. View As: One Page Slides

The groundbreaking Marriage of Art and Technology at the 1939 World’s Fair depicted a prototype high-tech exhibition to launch the New York Center for Advanced Art.

A rooftop scene at Club Roxbury. The nightclub was founded in 1995 by curator Robert Feenie and DJ Cassidy, who performed at its inauguration. He has curated the NYC opening of the upcoming Met Gala.

The Manhattan skyline during the Prohibition, when the only place to drink was at speakeasies. Soon, thanks to Prohibition, a wealth of art and literary criticism was published from the city’s alt.press. This black-and-white image, taken in 1939, is of Manhattan’s famous The Magazine Tower at Wall Street. Source: David Hammond, The Official History of City, New York: 1955-1959, Book A + B.

The 1930s marked the beginning of radio as a serious art form, and creator Edward R. Murrow provided a continuing, high-powered service for millions of Americans on Saturday nights.

Actor Sydney Greenstreet also worked with print and radio art.

The 1939 aerial tour of New York City by the Goodyear Blimp. The blimp, known as Dot, was flown by Al Newman in different parts of the city each week from 1941 until its retirement in 1965.

The new permanent gallery at New York’s Neue Galerie focuses on the German origins of the art of silkscreen, first developed as a means of printing advertising images during the late 19th century.

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