5 kitchen appliances that won’t need a power outlet when the sun shines

Brett Atwood and Joshua Montoya NaturalNews.com The American solar industry is embracing the power of the sun to power everything from home appliances to intercontinental travel. Solar cells are everywhere — from self-build kits…

5 kitchen appliances that won’t need a power outlet when the sun shines

Brett Atwood and Joshua Montoya

NaturalNews.com

The American solar industry is embracing the power of the sun to power everything from home appliances to intercontinental travel.

Solar cells are everywhere — from self-build kits to solar-powered cooking equipment. And many solar power companies are issuing their own special cooking-related products, a concept that is nothing new.

“We sell some cooking products based on the aesthetics of how people are using them,” says Zachary Booth, CEO of Eve Solar, a solar panel manufacturer that recently teamed up with kitchenware giant Goodwill Industries to create solar cookers.

What these solar cookers may lack in power, they make up for in looks. Booth likens solar cookers to stoves: They can be high-tech, or simple, wooden and probably less loud. The products range from house ones to satellites aimed at the inner solar system, which tap solar energy to cook over the edge of space.

In the kitchen, there are frying pans and dehydrated foods that allow cooks to eat directly from the sun. The retro-fitting of everyday consumer appliances to solar power has attracted homebuilders and lawmakers, who are in various stages of developing new laws and regulations that would require certain devices to be solar-powered.

The first law to be approved by the American consumer protection agency was the Microwave Tech Self-Identification Act, passed in December of last year. Under this new law, it is mandatory to identify whether your microwave uses power from the sun. The display on your microwave must now include an indicator of whether it uses solar power.

For example, a panel not-so-seamlessly transformed from a microwave oven to a solar-powered appliance can now be named the Blade, for its glowing reflective end.

While solar power is not yet a new technology to the U.S., it has seen an exponential increase in recent years. Five years ago, solar power still made up only a fraction of the country’s electricity generation, according to DataCenter.com. Today, solar accounts for roughly 10 percent of the nation’s overall electricity.

The solar industry projects more than 40,000 megawatts of solar capacity to be added to the U.S. in the next five years, with an average capacity of 11 megawatts.

Solar panel-owning companies need more solar power-dependent products to make solar a viable alternative to fossil fuels. But reaching your gadget’s full solar power potential will depend largely on the quality of the electricity in the house and its location. The more the sun shines in any given area, the more energy your home can generate.

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Atwood is currently the editor-in-chief of NaturalNews.com. On his blog, from interviews to analysis, he presents ideas and opinions on science and environmentalism. He also contributes to The Fix as an economic columnist and writes about several other topics: political commentary, media and finance.

Montoya is the primary editor of “The Common Good,” a monthly bulletin and ebook for political moderates to explore common ground and avoid ideological positions at the intersection of right and left. Atwood and Montoya are the co-authors of “Sandcastles and Oil Sands: The U.S. and Canada’s Eco-Friendly Energy Revolution.”

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